Assam TGFOP1 Loose Tea

Images

Assam TGFOP1 Loose Tea

Details

0
Item No. MSTR314856
£7.50 - £13.00

Out of stock

Variations

  • Format:
    • Loose Tea Pouch, 100g
      £7.50
    • Loose Tea Caddy, 100g
      £13.00

Add to cart options

Product Actions

Select Styles for Availability
Code: MSTR314856

Additional Information

  • Description
    Sweet, strong and substantial, this superbly high grade of Assam is a beautiful tea for breakfast. We'd suggest brewing lightly to appreciate its layered honeyed flavours, but a stronger steeping creates a wonderfully dark, almost treacle-toned cup, perfectly matched with milk. Harvested in late spring (known as the “second flush”), our Assam TGFOP1 2nd Flush has a large unbroken leaf and plenty of buds and golden tips: in other words, “Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe”. It may be rather a mouthful – but one sip of this superbly rich and malty brew and you might just remember the name.
  • Ingredients

    Black Tea

    Suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

  • Reviews

TEA TYPE

Black Tea

TASTE PROFILE

Full-bodied, with layered tones of malt and honey

FOOD PAIRING

High cocoa content, dark chocolate

Numerology

NO.

888

Assam was one of the very first teas to be cultivated by the British in the 19th century. We’ve numbered this tea 888 to reflect the year that British tea imports from India exceeded those for China, in 1888. Just two years after Walter Whittard set up shop in 1886, the British tea industry entered a new era…

Brew the Perfect cup

Teaspoons (2 grams)

1

1 cup

200ml water

100 degrees

time

3-5 mins

Origin: India

Tea plantations were first introduced to India by the British in the 19th century, after Robert Fortune stole Chinese tea cuttings to plant in the Himalayan region of Darjeeling. Today Indian tea is some of the most famous in the world: it's also home to Assam tea, found growing wild there by the Scottish explorer Robert Bruce.

Black Tea

Fully oxidised for a rich, robust flavour, black tea is the most popular type of tea in the western world – and for good reason. Its full body and depth of flavour make many black teas ideal for drinking with a splash of milk, while more delicate varieties like Darjeeling express a huge range of complex characteristics.