Ceylon Kenilworth Loose Tea

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Ceylon Kenilworth Loose Tea

Details

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Item No. MSTR314831
£6.50 - £12.00

Out of stock

Variations

  • Format:
    • Loose Tea Pouch, 100g
      £6.50
    • Loose Tea Caddy, 100g
      £12.00

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Code: MSTR314831

Additional Information

  • Description
    This outstanding example of an Orange Pekoe grade Ceylon tea has been sourced from the Kenilworth Estate in the western Sri Lankan hills. Named after Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire, the estate is renowned for its traditionally mature style of Ceylon, characterised by an attractively long, unbroken leaf and subtle oaky tones to the cup.
  • Ingredients

    Black Tea

    Suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

  • Reviews

TEA TYPE

Black Tea

TASTE PROFILE

Rich, Citrus, Smooth

FOOD PAIRING

Lemon polenta cake

Numerology

NO.

47

We’ve numbered our Kenilworth Ceylon tea 47 to reflect the founding date of the Estate, 1947.

Brew the Perfect cup

Teaspoons (2 grams)

1

1 cup

200ml water

100 degrees

time

3-5 mins

Origin: Sri Lanka

Coffee plantations were originally Sri Lanka's main economic resource, and it wasn't until the 1870s that a sudden blight devastated the coffee plantations and allowed tea to take centre stage. Today, "Ceylon" tea – known by the country's former colonial name – is famed for its clean, brisk taste.

A Near-Perfect Origin

At altitudes of up to 4,000 feet, the 700-acre Kenilworth Estate profits from the fresh climate and seasonal monsoons of the hills. The best tender leaves are picked after the first monsoon and processed during the cooler weather, allowing the tea to develop its famously smooth, almost creamy texture – you'll taste none of the astringency sometimes associated with Ceylon tea. Indeed, Kenilworth holds the record for the highest price ever paid at auction for its Orange Pekoe grade tea – clear, complex and refreshingly sweet, it's not hard to see why.

Black Tea

Fully oxidised for a rich, robust flavour, black tea is the most popular type of tea in the western world – and for good reason. Its full body and depth of flavour make many black teas ideal for drinking with a splash of milk, while more delicate varieties like Darjeeling express a huge range of complex characteristics.