How to Make Iced Tea

For a refreshingly delicious easy iced tea that packs a flavour punch, look no further…

What’s Iced Tea and How Does It Differ to Cold Brew Tea?

Iced tea is brewed in the same way as traditional tea, then cooled over ice. Cold brew tea differs in that there’s minimal exposure to heat; instead time is used to extract the tea’s flavours. Fancy experimenting with cold brew tea too? Check out our Cold Brew Tea page.

Step-by-Step Guide to Making Iced Tea

Loose leaf tea

2 teaspoons loose tea

Add freshly boiled water

Add 100ml freshly boiled water

Top up with ice

Top with ice

Garnish with fruit

Fruit or mint to garnish

  • Pop 2 teaspoons of loose tea per cup in a refillable teabag or an infuser.
  • Add 100ml freshly boiled water (for less processed teas like green, white or yellow, use water closer to 80°C) per cup and leave for 15 minutes.
  • Give the grinds a quick stir and put the lid on.
  • Top up with plenty of ice.
  • Garnish with fruit and sprigs of mint if desired.

Recipe: Cherry Blossom Iced Tea

Choco Rooibos

INGREDIENTS

700ml water

180ml lemon juice

200g sugar

1½ tsp grenadine

METHOD

  1. Heat the sugar with 200ml of the water, stirring until dissolved. Set aside.
  2. Heat the remaining water in a pan until it begins to simmer. Remove from the heat and add the tea, leaving it to sit for 5 minutes. Strain and refrigerate for 1 hour.
  3. Combine the tea with the lemon juice, grenadine and 90ml of the sugar syrup. Pour over ice and enjoy.

A Note From Our Tea Expert

“I’d recommend using loose tea rather than teabags to make iced tea. Cold dampens the teas’ natural flavours, so it’s important to create a stronger brew than you would with a traditional cuppa. A lot of people counter this by adding sugar, but I think a longer brewing time can be equally effective. Teabags are specifically designed to brew quickly, so extending the time will make them taste bitter, whereas loose tea is designed to brew more slowly and gently, making it the perfect choice for iced tea.”

Linda, Tea Buyer