Caddies

There are containers, storage tins and jars – and then there’s the seemingly humble caddy: a centuries-old symbol of tea-drinking tradition.

Did you know?

The term “caddy” originates from the Malaysian word “kati”, a weight equivalent to just over a pound, and the measurement by which tea used to be sold.

Our Caddy Collection

The options are endless…

Choco Rooibos
Choco Rooibos

Pre-packed Tea Caddies

For ease, many of our loose teas can be purchased in 100g tea caddies.

Choco Rooibos

Fill-Me-Up Tea Caddies

Available in blue, purple, green and bronze, our beautiful Fill-Me-Up Caddies leave it up to you to choose the tea.

--> Choco Rooibos
Choco Rooibos
Choco Rooibos

Mini Caddies

From Alice in Wonderland illustrations to scenes of London’s streetscape, our delightfully decorated 40g mini caddies may be small, but they certainly pack a big punch.

Choco Rooibos

Gift a Caddy

Our quintessentially English Tea Discoveries caddies and elegant ceramic caddies are sure to make an impression – they’re a tea lover’s dream.

--> Choco Rooibos
Choco Rooibos
Choco Rooibos

Not Forgetting Coffee, Too…

Our elegant empty Copper Coffee Caddies have a slot for your own handwritten label, with five blank labels inside.

We’re All Mad About Caddies…

Why? It’s quite simple really:

Caddy

They protect the taste of your favourite tea. Enjoy a fresh, flavoursome cup every time.

Caddy

They speak simple elegance. Add a touch of pizzazz to your kitchen shelf.

Travel Mug

They’re environmentally friendly. Fill them up again and again, or if you’re feeling creative, why not upcycle them into marvellous plant pots?

Travel Mug

They’re cost-effective. Not only can you reinfuse most loose leaf teas several times, but we’ll give you 50p off when you refill your loose tea caddy in store.

The History of the Caddy

Choco Rooibos

17th century

When tea was introduced to England from China in the 1600s, Chinese porcelain caddies, which were similar in shape to a ginger jar, would often accompany it to store the tea in. Initially, tea was only available to drink in coffeehouses, so it wasn’t until the 18th century that the household caddy really took off, becoming something of a status symbol.

18th–19th century

Once tea leaves could be bought, it was only the wealthy that could afford them – and a craftsman would be tasked with creating an ornate caddy using materials such as wood, metal and tortoiseshell to protect this highly prized possession. Many even had locks installed, with the key kept under the watchful eye of the lady of the house.

Choco Rooibos

Today

The caddy may be a little more reserved now, but it remains a staple of kitchens across Britain.